Arm Swing Routine – Exercises

1) Gentle Neck Rolls (exercise)

2) Reverse Gentle Neck Rolls

3) Trunk twists (exercise)

4) Reverse Trunk Twists

5) Leg swing forward and back (exercise)

6) Other leg swings forward and back

7) Leg swings lateral with abductor and adductor motions (exercise)

8) Switch legs and swing laterally.

9) Foot Spins (exercise)

10) Foot Spins with same foot in the other direction.

11) Foot Spins on other foot

12) Foot Spins on other foot other direction

13) Kneeling position (exercise)

14) Right Arm forward Arm Swing (exercise)

15) Left Arm Forward Arm Swing

16) Right Arm Backwards Arm Swing (exercise)

17) Left Arm Backwards

18) Right arm swing in a Sideways Figure 8 Motion (exercise)

19) Right Arm Figure 8 in the Reverse Direction

20) Left Arm Figure 8

21) Left Arm Figure 8 Reverse

22) Up the Sides with both arms (exercise)

23) Up the Front Arm Swings (exercise)

24) Horizontal Arm Swings (exercise)

25) Opposites Arm Swings (exercise)

26) Opposite-Opposites Arm Swings (exercise)

27) Wrist, door-knob open (exercise)

28) Wrist door-knob close

29) Wrist range of motion (exercise)

30) Other wrist range of motion

31) Sit ups (exercise)

32) Yoga Cobra (Exercise)

33) Rattle Snakes (exercise)

34) Hamstring Stretch with Legs in Figure 4 (exercise)

35) Other Side, 4 for Legs

36) Yoga Butterfly Stretch (exercise)

37) Knee to ear (exercise)

38) Other knee to each ear

39) Butterfly arm motion (exercise)

40) Backstroke arm motion (exercise)

41) Breastroke arm motion (exercise)

42) Freestyle arm motion (exercise)

43) Toe raises (exercise)

44) Other leg toe raises

45) Heel raises (exercise)

46) Heel raises with other leg

47) Squat stoop (exercise)

Older Grant Applications for Beta Burgh

Grant proposal posted in 2016.

Three proposals were made to the Pittsburgh Downtown Partnerships for its BetaBurgh RFP (request for proposals). The grants are for up to $10,000 each. See the text of those links by surfing around these links:

Directory:

Open water swimming, Swim.CLOH.org

River lagoons, 4RS.org

Floating pools feasibility, Rauterkus.com

How Being a Disruptor Can Serve Your Business and the World

We’re all living through a period of significant disruption. When the seas are rough, the temptation is to hunker down, batten down the hatches, and hope you survive until it all blows over.

But what if disruption represents an opportunity, an opportunity for your business?

Then it makes sense to let go, expose yourself to the wind and waves, and see where the opportunity takes you.

Big-time disruptors like Richard Branson sure have rocked the business world with his unorthodox approach, being a sometimes outrageous voice and defying all predictions that excelling in multiple sectors would never work. He’s grown billion-dollar businesses in finance, hospitality, and airlines, to name a few.

Similarly, cryptocurrency like Bitcoin continues to grow, despite early predictions that it would never last. Instead, cryptocurrency is rocking the finance world by bypassing third parties like banks and credit card companies. We no longer have to ask for permission to transact, and neither do the billions around the world who don’t have the luxury of stable banks and access to credit cards. We can all carry on business transactions directly via our smartphones.

Why would you want to be a disruptor?

For the good of your business. When your business becomes a source of disruption, you create new opportunities. It can give you a significant competitive advantage: your disruption makes you unique and helps you stand out. You can innovate on a larger scale.

Why would you want to be a disruptor?

For the good of the world. It opens the door to people who may not previously have had access to what you offer. Your innovative ideas can change lives.

You’ll want to be smart about it. Know yourself and your marketplace. Take calculated risks, not ungrounded ones. Make a difference that matters, not just for the sake of disruption.

Being a disruptor is not easy. The volatility and uncertainty can be unsettling. You have to get comfortable with discomfort, as things shapeshift before your eyes in an evolving situation.

Still, it may all be worth it for your business to be a nexus of disruption. You’ll open up whole new markets. You’ll be a beacon with your innovative approach, drawing people with clarity and purpose. And you’ll contribute to making the world a better place when you make a difference with all our welfare in your heart.

What could you disrupt about your business that would serve that higher purpose?


Ursula Jorch is a speaker, business coach and consultant who helps entrepreneurs grow a successful business that makes a difference in the world. A 21-year successful entrepreneur herself, Ursula helps you define the difference you want to make in the world and develop strategy and marketing so you have ever-expanding impact.

Find Ursula on her podcast, Work Alchemy: The Impact Interviews where she interviews impactful entrepreneurs and leaders like Seth Godin and Marianne Williamson, and at WorkAlchemy.com for free resources for you and your business.

This article was originally published at https://www.workalchemy.com/business-innovation-disruptor and has been syndicated with permission.