Category Archives for "Open water"

Escort members wanted for a three month swim in the Pacific

| Invite

Try this on for size if you have nothing to do. 


Escort Crew Members Wanted For 3-Month Gyre Swim

Posted: 25 Mar 2019 08:53 PM PDT

Courtesy of Ben LecomteDiscovery GO

Ben Lecomte attempted a transpacific solo stage swim from Choshi, Japan, starting on June 5th with an aim to reach San Francisco, California after 8,721 km, estimated to take them 6 - 8 months. 

Lecomte did not complete The Swim, but they did spend 5 months and 15 days at sea.

Lecomte and his escort team inched their way across 1,523 nautical miles (2,822 km) in the Pacific Ocean as they encountered storms, relentlessly difficult swimming conditions, and countless marine life from whales to hundreds of dolphins. 

While sharks and turtles were also commonplace, but their daily encounters with plastic and marine trash was most shocking. Part of Lecomte's mission was to collect data for 30 scientific institutes, so the crew obtained and stored more than 1,700 plastic samples of flotsam that they encountered in the Pacific. 

Despite The Swim v.1 ended in a DNF, Lecomte and his team are now focused on plastic pollution on The Swim v.2. Lecomte and 10 crew members will head back to the Pacific Ocean this May when he will swim through the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. He reports, "We will focus on dispelling myths surrounding the patch, as well as helping scientists better understand what is accumulating in the gyre. Our production partner Seeker helped with this narrative during our first stage of the ocean crossing, and received more than 1 million YouTube views [see video below]."



"We are now seeking new crazy, fun, passionate and skilled volunteers to help on the next leg of the adventure. We’re looking for new crew members to volunteer on a 3-month swimming and sailing expedition from Hawaii to California. Positions include marine engineers, scientists, sailors, medics, influencers and plastic warriors available from May to September 2019." 

Previous sailing experience is preferred, but not required. Send your CV to join@thelongestswim.com.

To watch a summary of the first attempt, visit here.

Copyright © 2008-2019 by World Open Water Swimming Association

From World Open Water Swimming Association's Daily News of Open Water Swimming

Older Grant Applications for Beta Burgh

| CLOH concepts

Grant proposal posted in 2016.

Three proposals were made to the Pittsburgh Downtown Partnerships for its BetaBurgh RFP (request for proposals). The grants are for up to $10,000 each. See the text of those links by surfing around these links:

Directory:

Open water swimming, Swim.CLOH.org

River lagoons, 4RS.org

Floating pools feasibility, Rauterkus.com

Local death in a swimming accident in a creek

| Open water

Gentleman was a football running back. His body was missing for a few days, despite multiple searches.

http://triblive.com/local/westmoreland/13745650-74/searchers-find-body-of-connellsville-swimmer-missing-since-tuesday

Searchers find body of Connellsville swimmer missing since Tuesday

by Jeff Himler, published Sunday, June 10, 2018

Searchers Sunday morning found the body of a Connellsville man who had been missing since Tuesday in South Huntingdon and was presumed drowned.

The body of Dylan Knopsnider, 21, was pulled from the waters of Jacobs Creek at about 9:30 a.m. Sunday, according to state police Tpr. Robert Broadwater of the Uniontown barracks. He said Knopsnider’s body surfaced in the middle of the creek about 50 yards from where he entered the water Tuesday evening in a popular but remote swimming hole about two miles downstream from the Chaintown Road bridge.

Dive teams, firefighters and cadaver dogs from multiple counties had been searching the area fruitlessly for signs of Knopsnider since Tuesday. Broadwater said officials believe heavy rainfall may have helped bring the body to the surface. Firefighters from Dawson and a Murrysville dive team were involved in the search Sunday, according to a Fayette County 911 supervisor.

Jacobs Creek is at the border of Westmoreland and Fayette counties, and the Fayette County Coroner’s office was available to identify and take charge of the body, Broadwater said.

An autopsy is planned.

It is believed Knopsnider lost his footing and hit his head on a rock as he jumped into water about 10 to 15 feet deep downstream of a waterfall, police said. The creek was swollen by a storm earlier Tuesday, creating a fast current.

Trooper Adam Janosko said one of Knopsnider’s friends told police he jumped in the water in an attempt to rescue Knopsnider but could not reach him.

A Connellsville Area High School graduate, Knopsnider was a running back and strong safety for the school’s football team from 2012 to 2014.

 

What happens when a person is trapped in a riptide?

| Open water

In a rip tide, really a rip current, the swimmer is pulled out to sea. First of all, while in the current, you don’t know it. You might be with a friend and giving attention there, and then you glance to the shore line, perhaps just 20 or 30 yards away about 10-seconds ago, and it is going farther and farther away.

Rip tides are hard to spot and notice when you are in them. And, they are not easy to see when standing on the beach. Rookies to the beach are oblivious. It is good to have some understanding of them as they are dangerous and not well understood.

I am a swim coach and a very good swimmer. However, I’m no match for the pull of a rip tide or the rip current.

Often, when the situation is noticed, the rookie swimmer who is caught in that situation tries to save himself by getting out of the water and heading straight onto the land at the beach. Good goal, but it isn’t smart to go straight against the the power of the rip current. The current is too strong, often.

You might be lucky in that it could be a small current or you might be just to its edge. You might be able to stand on the bottom too. And, rip tides loosen their grip, eventually.

What you do not want to do is swim yourself to exhaustion. Getting into oxygen debt and sprinting might be good for about 20-seconds. Some might go 40-seconds. But then if you are totally spent physically and are no closer to the beach, your chances of survival are greatly diminished.

The other thing that kills is PANIC. Stay calm. Going nuts out in the water is going to tighten your muscles, compromise your breathing, speed your heart rate and present a faster ticket to your death.

With good fortune, you’re at a beach that is guarded with professional lifeguards who are not already occupied with pulling other tourist out of another rip current. If the lifeguards can be notified — GREAT.

Where are your friends and family. I hope that the supervision is in effect and perhaps they’re summoning a lifeguard, PRONTO. You might be surrounded with your friends and family and all of you in dire straights. Hope that’s not the case.

I know of two brothers in their 20s who were both sweapt out in a rip current on their last day of vacation in Costa Rica. An hour later, the one guy made it back to shore and the other’s body was found a few days later. This ordeal might take many minutes to unfold. They got separated in the first moments of knowing what was unfolding. That’s so sad.

Can you stay together? Look out for each other. Calm one another. Take turns waving, shouting, resting.

The wise move is to swim out of the current. Are the waves breaking differently to the one side or the other? Swim parallel to the shore, generally, so that you are not going directly against the current, but rather with it slightly and then to the side.

After you get out of the current, swimming back to safety is going to be easy.

FLOAT. Take gentle strokes. To swim, you’ll need to get to the top of the water with your legs and hips, floating more like a boat and not being vertical like a building. Boats float. Buildings sink. Boats and swimmers that look like tall buildings sink. Get flat and horizontal. Let your head stay low. Bring your feet up.

It is okay to swim three, four or five strokes on your front and then roll over to your back and take breaths, keep a gentle kick, watch out for the next waves and rest with the head back, chest, belly and legs up near the surface. Then when ready, flip back to the front and take some additional strokes.

Another great tip that more people need to follow: WEAR FINS in the open water. Surf rescue lifeguards, Coast Guard Swimmers, NAVY Seals and others who work in the water wear FINS. Recreational swimmers, body surfers and even those learning to competitive swim should be with FINS on while in the water. Our feet with fins are far more effective and efficient. Take your fins with you on vacation and wear them when on the beach and in the water. With fins, you’ll be able to kick with some power and speed in a sideways direction and get out of the rip.

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