Tag Archives for " video "

Swim Team (documentary) is available for free viewing for a limited time

| S6

The film, Swim Team, chronicles the extraordinary rise of three diverse young athletes, capturing a moving quest for inclusion, independence and a life that feels like winning.

Parents of a boy on the autism spectrum form a competitive swim team, recruiting other teens on the spectrum and training them with high expectations and zero pity.

Documentary film is by Lara Stolman. Find out more: http://www.pbs.org/pov/swimteam/ The movie, Swim Team, is streaming on PBS's POV.  http://www.pbs.org/pov/swimteam/video

Outside of YMCA in New Jersey

Home of the New Jersey Hammerheads, a YMCA

Trailer is 3-minutes long. Full movie is 2-hours in length.

Swimming on a rope!

| Equipment

GoSwim.tv talks and demonstrates tethered swimming

Wonderful introduction!

Some extra ideas from Mark

We called that, "Naked paddles." Perhaps that is a bit "old school." But, it offeres some better lingo than "strapless."

I'd suggest putting the other end of the tubing much higher in the air. You need to have a good base that isn't going to get pulled into the pool, or hit others if it were to fall. And, you don't want it on the building near a window so if the belt comes off the swimmer, or the connection gets bad, or the tube should break, it won't recoil and hit a person or property -- like breaking a window. We loved hooking the end, the place that does not move, to the balcony railing. But, we also made certain that none would walk on that side of the pool. Even putting it onto the blocks is not tall enough.

A tall base helps to get over that that hip sink feeling.

Another tip / activity, put on double or triple belts. Or, just double or triple the tubing. Then it should be tight while you are at the close wall. Then the intensity is much greater. Then you can work the push-off and streamline out from the wall and underwater kick, surface and try like crazy to hit the other end. Doing that on back, side and front many times in a row is working on the jump off the walls.

Of course, the base of the tubing needs to be anchored perhaps 5 to 10 yards/meters from the near edge of the pool. Then there will be some strain just getting into the pool.

Watch out for snapping equipment! Be careful.

Steve’s Zoom call(s), to cover 400 dry land exercises

| Equipment

Coach Steve Friederang, the Editor of Competitive Swimmer Magazine and CEO of Competitiveswimmer.com

  • Coach Friederang has degrees and teaching credentials in kinesiology, motivational psychology, and English. 
  • He has coached over 100 age group swimmers to the US top 16 and National records, All Americans, and world-ranked athletes who learned their first flip turn from him.
  • Steve loves coaching coaches and has presented at ASCA, ISCA, the U.S. Olympic Training Center. He has led international workshops and is writing his third book, "Perfecting Practice".
  • Steve also co-authored Cool Coach software and designs training equipment, the most recent of which is the Smart Pulley. 

Steve's thrilled to invite you into his home gym and workshop to share in real time.

See and learn of creative concepts on exercises to improve swimming performances and joint balance between practices. Steve can help you help swimmers make a habit of doing specific things between practices that help them help themselves, going from good to great!

Content that makes swimmers swim faster. 

• Teach swimmers to apply the S.A.I.D. principle to their dryland training.
• Interact with Steve, live, in the most specific dryland swim environment.
• Build a plan for your swimmers to come back to swimming with better strokes and more specific strength and a HABIT of doing the right exercises between team practices.

Update: Watch the first recorded event in the series.

400,000 members and Josh’s view

| Swim

Josh Davis tells his ideas about what to expect with USA Swimming's 400,000 members.

Olympic Gold Medalist and founder of UltimateSwimmer.com addresses the importance for coaches to "get it right" while swimmers are 12-18 years old. His commitment to the well-being of the swimmers who won't be going to the Olympics speaks volumes of his interest in young swimmers everywhere. He sees USRPT as a life-long solution for those who love swimming and want to enjoy it beyond their high school years.

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